Articles tagged 'Events'

Media fracas follows seminar

Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar speaker Chris Gaskin’s light hearted suggestion that New Zealand should replace the kiwi with a seabird as its native symbol has taken off.

The Otago Daily Times followed up by ‘interviewing’ a royal albatross, yellow-eyed penguin, and an ‘Otago shag’ on their views.

Three reasons Dunedin birds should replace kiwi

Meanwhile, the announcement that the Holdaway Award had been presented by Skype to Biz Bell in the Turks and Caicos Islands created the front page lead of the New Zealand Herald: (with no mention of the award). Kiwis brace for impact as Hurricane Irma approaches

A follow up story this week reported that Biz and her team were pitching in to help residents with the clean-up. Kiwi scientists in Caribbean pest eradication project pitching in

Way to go Biz.

Māori maritime history

The story of the boats that supplied Auckland with kauri and fresh produce from the outer Hauraki Gulf islands will be told through an interactive multi-discipline exhibition at the Auckland Maritime Museum.

The scow Ida, and the cutter Te Rangatira, were owned by Tenetahi Pohuehue and Rahui Te Kiri of Pakiri (Ngāti Manuhiri and Ngātiwai) and sailed by their children.

These highly skilled sailors were often competitive and victorious in the Auckland Regatta.

Organiser Olivia Haddon says the focus of the programme is to “tell our tupuna stories to our mokopuna rangatahi as they are our future heroes” through workshops on traditional rope making, navigation and dancing to heritage.

The exhibition and workshops run from Oct 7-21 as part of the Auckland Heritage Festival

Future of farming and fishing

The future of farming and fishing were the subject of insightful discussion at the recent Environmental Defence Society Conference on Tipping Points.

New technologies such as ‘cellular agriculture’ are set to challenge old fashioned farming attitudes and increase the rate of uptake of sustainable practices, explained Dr Rosie Bosworth, a Senior Strategic Planner with ‘Rethink X’. Landcorp’s CEO Steve Carden outlined his vision for the future and the practical proactive approach being taken to adapt.

Sanford CEO Volker Kuntsch, Te Ohu Kaimoana CE Dion Tuuta and WWF head of Campaigns Peter Hardstaff addressed fisheries, their ‘big’ words being Transparency, Respect and Humility.

See video here

John’s Perspective

Last week we celebrated our eighth annual Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar with nearly 300 guests at Auckland Museum.

It was – as usual – a wonderful affirmation of the community that cares about the Hauraki Gulf/ Tīkapa Moana/ Te Moananui o Toi.

The theme of seabirds – ngā manu o te moana – enabled us to explore the practical details of conservation effort, as well as to soar high and consider broader relationships with nature.

I was struck by many presentations, among them Dame Anne Salmond’s assertion that our future is inextricably tangled with those of other lifeforms.

This edition of Gulf Journal revisits several talks: Rochelle Constantine’s taking of ‘the pulse of the Gulf’ and Mook Hohneck’s call for an embrace of Te Reo. We acknowledge the leadership of Biz Bell, who has shared the story of the taiko/ black petrel so generously and effectively. We update the quest of Jochen Zaeschmar – a speaker at the 2016 seminar – to find the elusive false killer whale and we recall a notorious centenary for Motuihe Island.

Enjoy these stories and the sustenance that the Gulf provides.

Mayor John Tregidga
Chair, Hauraki Gulf Forum.

World First: Hanging Mussel Taura in Ōkahu Bay

Weaving together traditional and aquaculture industry techniques will provide the best of both worlds for rope that will be seeded with mussels to be hung from the pylons of Ōkahu Bay wharf. This taura (rope) is intended to seed larger amounts of mussels into the bay over time by avoiding the sea floor which is covered in sediment. The mussel taura (rope) has been woven by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei weavers who have harvested the harakeke (flax) from their ancestral whenua (land).

With a vision to return the mauri (essence of life) back to the marine environment a 3-year mussel reef restoration programme in Ōkahu Bay has attempted to bring back historical mussel beds. Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei have committed themselves to returning the whenua (land) and moana (water) back to healthy state for 15 years through their planting of 220,000 trees on the whenua (land). “Protection of our waters and providing a future for our whanau is paramount for us, our daily connection with the moana recognises our ancestors and their kaitiakitanga” (guardianship)” says Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei descendant, Donna Tamaariki.

Tipping points conference

The Environmental Defence Society will consider tipping points in its annual conference to be held in Auckland on 9-10 August. EDS says the conference will address important issues regarding the state of New Zealand’s terrestrial, marine and freshwater biodiversity.

“Recent state of the environment reporting shows New Zealand faces continuing challenges with ecological losses. We will dig deep into these issues and focus on solutions. Being an election year, we will be profiling political party leaders and looking for high quality engagement from all attendees.”

www.edsconference.com

Bill Ballantine

Bill Ballantine lecture

The second Bill Ballantine Memorial Lecture on Thursday March 2 will look at the proposed Sea Change Tai Timu Tai Pari marine spatial plan and the prospects for the restoration of horse mussel beds in the Gulf.

Alison Henry and Prof Simon Thrush will lead discussions from 7-8.30 pm in Lecture theatre 4 in the Owen Glenn Building, University of Auckland.

Details here

Do The Right Thing: The 2016 Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar

Do the right thing

The 2016 Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar asks what it takes to Do The Right Thing

  • Can our primary industries reinvent themselves and their relationship with ecosystems?
  • What is people-power unleashing around our islands, reefs and harbours?
  • How can 600 years of indigenous knowledge and culture inform the way?
  • Are fly fishing for kahawai and sailing with whales signs of the times?
  • And where might the government fit in all this?

The Hauraki Gulf Forum has assembled an outstanding line-up of speakers for its seventh annual seminar on Tuesday, September 13 at Auckland Museum.

Book here

Polynesian waka arrival in Auckland

Waka return

Waka racing has returned to the Waitematā.

The inaugural Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festival was hosted on Auckland Anniversary weekend in January, reviving a 150 year old tradition.
The programme included competitive inter-tribal races and opportunities for the public to paddle a waka and learn about their cultural significance.

Orakei Water Sports president and Hauraki Gulf Forum member Moana Tamaariki-Pohe said the gathering of waka ama, waka tangata, waka taua and waka hourua represented a dream come true for her father, Ngati Whatua kaumatua Tamaiti Tamaariki.

Read more here

Winter planting opportunities

Plant now

Volunteer Week is June 21-27 with the theme “there is a place for you to volunteer”. Winter tree planting activities are being organised on Gulf islands and in regional parks.”

Motuihe Island recently celebrated planting its 400,000th tree since 2003. Red Boat Ferries run to the island every 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month.

National Volunteer Week
www.motuihe.org.nz

Waiheke rubbish crew

Rubbish mountain

Love your Coast Waiheke Island recently posted a video of its 2015 clean-up campaign.

Over 400 students from low decile schools participated with support from Pureology, Auckland Council and Sealink, says Sustainable Coastlines Co Founder and CEO Sam Judd.

Volunteers removed 7,755 litres of litter (equivalent to 155 full rubbish sacks) from island beaches over seven event days.

Love Your Coast Waiheke Island 2015

Takaparawhau restoration

Matariki milestone

Matariki, the Māori New Year, starts this year on June 18 and more than 100 events are planned in Auckland alone.

Ngāti Whātua Orākei invites volunteers to help restore coastal forest in its Ko Te Pukaki project on June 20 at Takaparawhau (Bastion Point). NatureWatch NZ, a monitoring tool to help community groups understand changes in response to restoration projects, will be demonstrated through the day, followed by a hangi.

www.matarikifestival.org.nz
www.naturewatch.org.nz

Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Hauraki Gulf Forum