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1 week ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum

A great opportunity to get in the moana this weekend with Experiencing Marine Reserves - EMR 🤿 ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum

We're lucky to have legends like Steve Hathaway from Young Ocean Explorers looking after the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park. Check out this video: one aihe / dolphin lived to see another day thanks to Steve's help. A big reminder of the lethal risk of discarded nets and lines to our beautiful marine life 🐬 ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum
Kia ora koutou, a massive thank you to all our supporters and followers for your aroha and manaaki in 2020. For us, a lot of 2020 has been about the set-up: adopting co-governance leadership, agreeing our four big goals for the Marine Park, and whakawhanaungatanga with the new government. In contrast, 2021 is moving year. We have big ambitions when it comes to mana whenua, community, central + local gov leadership in the year ahead. And there are a range of exciting developments on the cards. Until then, enjoy Tīkapa Moana, Te Moananui-ā-Toi. Catch you in 2021!   🐳

Kia ora koutou, a massive thank you to all our supporters and followers for your aroha and manaaki in 2020. For us, a lot of 2020 has been about the set-up: adopting co-governance leadership, agreeing our four big goals for the Marine Park, and whakawhanaungatanga with the new government. In contrast, 2021 is moving year. We have big ambitions when it comes to mana whenua, community, central + local gov leadership in the year ahead. And there are a range of exciting developments on the cards. Until then, enjoy Tīkapa Moana, Te Moananui-ā-Toi. Catch you in 2021! 🐳 ... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum

Tautoko Department of Conservation Auckland Council ... See MoreSee Less

3 weeks ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum
The Hauraki Gulf Marine Park is now 20 years old and in this time, 6 State of the Gulf reports have been produced. 

By and large, the same issues have repeatedly been highlighted. In some areas progress is being made, or appeared/appears to be. 

Environmentally, there are multiple emerging strands coming together including a ministerial advisory committee in response to the Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan, Sea Change – Tai Timu Tai Pari, Court of Appeals decisions and strengthening in tangata whenua conservation decision making to name a few.

It is, however, time to consider whether we got the balance between environmental, economic and social values right in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act, and whether there are better options for delivering integrated management and improved outcomes for the Gulf.

Read the sixth State of the Gulf report - https://gulfjournal.org.nz/state-of-the-gulf 

Photo: Gray Milmine

The Hauraki Gulf Marine Park is now 20 years old and in this time, 6 State of the Gulf reports have been produced.

By and large, the same issues have repeatedly been highlighted. In some areas progress is being made, or appeared/appears to be.

Environmentally, there are multiple emerging strands coming together including a ministerial advisory committee in response to the Hauraki Gulf Marine Spatial Plan, Sea Change – Tai Timu Tai Pari, Court of Appeals decisions and strengthening in tangata whenua conservation decision making to name a few.

It is, however, time to consider whether we got the balance between environmental, economic and social values right in the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Act, and whether there are better options for delivering integrated management and improved outcomes for the Gulf.

Read the sixth State of the Gulf report - gulfjournal.org.nz/state-of-the-gulf

Photo: Gray Milmine
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

There is no balance. The Hauraki Gulf needs better environmental protection. If the Hauraki Gulf Forum and Auckland Council can't do that another organisation needs to take that role. Thanks for the update

Some of the solutions are so simple and yet get ignored or issues are allowed to continue out of control.

Kiaora Pippa Coom how is the Hauraki Gulf Forum and Manukau Harbour Forum responding to the climate emergency and biodiversity crisis? Good luck in your Co chair role. Kia kaha

I am with Tane, the forum needs to step away and let those who have this taonga in their hearts protect it

4 weeks ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum
Did you know there are over 144 non-indigenous marine species and 7 marine pests in the marine park?

Non-indigenous species are capable of changing marine communities by competing with native species for food and space or directly consuming the native species themselves. They can also cause problems for human activity including fouling problems for boats, marine farms and other submerged structures. 

20 years ago there were around 66 non-indigenous marine species and 1 known marine pest, the Asian date mussel. There are now around 144 non-indigenous species (with a large proportion of this increase due to an increase in surveillance effort) and 7 marine pests - the Asian date mussel, wakame, Mediterranean fan worm, Australian droplet tunicate, clubbed tunicate, Asian paddle crab and carpet sea squirt. 

Once established, non-indigenous marine species are extremely difficult to eradicate thus preventing their introduction and spread is key to managing them. 

Current management measures include overseas vessels requiring to exchange or treat ballast water and have a clean hull before entering our waters. A six-monthly surveillance programme of high-risk ports and harbours to provide an early warning system of the arrival of new species has also been running since 2002. 

Read more about marine biosecurity in our State of the Gulf Report - https://gulfjournal.org.nz/state-of-the-gulf 

Photo: Invasive pests including Mediterranean fan worm, wakame and carpet sea squirt growing on Coromandel mussel lines by Shane Kelly

Did you know there are over 144 non-indigenous marine species and 7 marine pests in the marine park?

Non-indigenous species are capable of changing marine communities by competing with native species for food and space or directly consuming the native species themselves. They can also cause problems for human activity including fouling problems for boats, marine farms and other submerged structures.

20 years ago there were around 66 non-indigenous marine species and 1 known marine pest, the Asian date mussel. There are now around 144 non-indigenous species (with a large proportion of this increase due to an increase in surveillance effort) and 7 marine pests - the Asian date mussel, wakame, Mediterranean fan worm, Australian droplet tunicate, clubbed tunicate, Asian paddle crab and carpet sea squirt.

Once established, non-indigenous marine species are extremely difficult to eradicate thus preventing their introduction and spread is key to managing them.

Current management measures include overseas vessels requiring to exchange or treat ballast water and have a clean hull before entering our waters. A six-monthly surveillance programme of high-risk ports and harbours to provide an early warning system of the arrival of new species has also been running since 2002.

Read more about marine biosecurity in our State of the Gulf Report - gulfjournal.org.nz/state-of-the-gulf

Photo: Invasive pests including Mediterranean fan worm, wakame and carpet sea squirt growing on Coromandel mussel lines by Shane Kelly
... See MoreSee Less

4 weeks ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum

We are very concerned at these images of around 20 stingrays and eagle rays found dead just south of Whakakaiwhara Pt (Duder Regional Park) today. Mana whenua and Ministry for Primary Industries have been alerted. We deserve to know what happened to these beautiful taonga.

Photos taken by Shane Kelly
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Comment on Facebook

It does look to me like Orca.

Kathy White

1 month ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum
This large plastic balloon was found floating off Hauturu-o-Toi, Little Barrier Island today. Nearby were two dead kororā, little blue penguins. There may be no correlation but it was yet another reminder of the impact of land based pollution on our beautiful Hauraki Gulf Marine Park. 

Photo credit Nicola MacDonald

This large plastic balloon was found floating off Hauturu-o-Toi, Little Barrier Island today. Nearby were two dead kororā, little blue penguins. There may be no correlation but it was yet another reminder of the impact of land based pollution on our beautiful Hauraki Gulf Marine Park.

Photo credit Nicola MacDonald
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum
Did you know the marine park is the seabird capital of the world? Over 20% of the worlds seabird species use the area. 

Whilst island conservation work to eradicate pests has increased seabird breeding success, the conservation status of the majority of the seabird species that breed here has not improved. This is due to the multiple threats that seabirds face such as environmental change, disease and fisheries.

In 20 years, the % of Threatened species has increased from 4% to 22% and the number of Not Threatened species has declined from 44% to 22%. Threatened species include the spotted shag, tāiko/black petrel, toanui/flesh-footed shearwater and New Zealand fairy tern.

However, there have been some positive stories. The New Zealand storm petrel which was thought to be extinct was rediscovered in 2003 and later found to be breeding on Hauturu-o-Toi/Little Barrier Island.

The estimate seabird bycatch in commercial fisheries has declined by 54% since 2002. This is due to a variety of mitigation measures that have been implemented as well as training for longline fishes on smart fishing practices and the employment of seabird liaison officers.   

Read more about seabirds as well as our shorebirds in our State of the Gulf Report - https://gulfjournal.org.nz/state-of-the-gulf 

Photo: Spotted shag by Shaun Lee

Did you know the marine park is the seabird capital of the world? Over 20% of the world's seabird species use the area.

Whilst island conservation work to eradicate pests has increased seabird breeding success, the conservation status of the majority of the seabird species that breed here has not improved. This is due to the multiple threats that seabirds face such as environmental change, disease and fisheries.

In 20 years, the % of Threatened species has increased from 4% to 22% and the number of Not Threatened species has declined from 44% to 22%. Threatened species include the spotted shag, tāiko/black petrel, toanui/flesh-footed shearwater and New Zealand fairy tern.

However, there have been some positive stories. The New Zealand storm petrel which was thought to be extinct was rediscovered in 2003 and later found to be breeding on Hauturu-o-Toi/Little Barrier Island.

The estimate seabird bycatch in commercial fisheries has declined by 54% since 2002. This is due to a variety of mitigation measures that have been implemented as well as training for longline fishes on smart fishing practices and the employment of seabird liaison officers.

Read more about seabirds as well as our shorebirds in our State of the Gulf Report - gulfjournal.org.nz/state-of-the-gulf

Photo: Spotted shag by Shaun Lee
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

We also need to protect the seabirds food pantry.

1 month ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum
Ministry for Primary Industries is proposing a year-round closure of Cockle Bay / Tuwakamana to inter-tidal shellfish harvesting to allow for recovery. The decline of cockles at Cockle Bay is something our latest State of the Gulf 2020 highlighted. See more here:

https://www.mpi.govt.nz/dmsdocument/43027-Proposed-s11-Closure-of-Cockle-Bay-to-Intertidal-Shellfish-Harvesting

Ministry for Primary Industries is proposing a year-round closure of Cockle Bay / Tuwakamana to inter-tidal shellfish harvesting to allow for recovery. The decline of cockles at Cockle Bay is something our latest State of the Gulf 2020 highlighted. See more here:

www.mpi.govt.nz/dmsdocument/43027-Proposed-s11-Closure-of-Cockle-Bay-to-Intertidal-Shellfish-Harv...
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

The MPI reports no significant decline, and observations suggest there are healthy populations in these beds. I’m not against a closure based on sound ecological evidence but less inclined to support one based on exclusionary principles

1 month ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum
Is it safe to swim here? Unfortunately that is still an important question to ask in Aotearoa in 2020. Thankfully LAWA is here to help with up to date data for over 750 swimming spots around NZ. Enjoy your summer dip by checking first here:

https://www.lawa.org.nz/explore-data/swimming

Is it safe to swim here? Unfortunately that is still an important question to ask in Aotearoa in 2020. Thankfully LAWA is here to help with up to date data for over 750 swimming spots around NZ. Enjoy your summer dip by checking first here:

www.lawa.org.nz/explore-data/swimming
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago

Hauraki Gulf Forum

Earlier this year the Hauraki Gulf Forum took a historic decision to move to a co-governance leadership model. This video introduces our awesome Co-Chairs, Pippa Coom and Nicola MacDonald, their whakapapa to Tīkapa Moana, Te Moananui-ā-Toi, and their thoughts on co-governance leadership.👏🐳

Video credit to the ultra-talented Qiane Matata-Sipu and the team @ www.qiane.co.nz/
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

Beautiful my cousin. Where would we be without you. Your amazing and I love you heaps ♥️♥️♥️♥️

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