Articles tagged 'Community'

Thames scholar

A Waikato Regional Council scholarship has been awarded to Taylor Auld from Thames to assist in completing a Bachelor of Civil Engineering at Canterbury University.

Taylor received a number of academic awards at Thames High School and was involved in coastal clean-up initiatives through Scouts.
The $6,000 award is made annually through the council’s Waihou Piako catchment committee to support undergraduate study in the fields of engineering or resource management, particularly river and catchment management.

Read more here

Sweet sponsor

Storm-damaged Motutapu Island’s restoration project has received fresh funding from global fruit provider Dole.

Motutapu Restoration Trust General Manager Liz Brooks said the funding would enable the trust to further develop habitats to achieve its long-term goal of creating sustainable populations of takahē, Coromandel brown kiwi, tieke/saddlebacks and other threatened species.
Dole NZ General Manager Steve Barton said the company’s investment would provide stability and flexibility for restoration efforts

Motutapu has been closed to the public since roads, tracks and more than 5000 trees were damaged by Cyclone Debbie.
Volunteers have continued the planting programme with the island due to re-open to the public on Labour Weekend.

http://www.motutapu.org.nz

Historic yacht being restored

A historic Auckland racing yacht is being restored after years of rotting in the Hauraki Gulf.

The 113-year-old Ariki, known for being the fastest yacht in Auckland from 1904 to 1938, was spotted at Bayswater Marina and purchased by Waiheke residents Charlotte Lockhart in 2016.

Ariki is being restored by Waiheke boat builder Robin Kenyon with the aim of having her back on the water by early 2018.

Ariki will be moored at the Maritime Museum in Auckland so the public can visit and she will be made available for Waiheke school students to sail.

Contact arikiclassicyacht@gmail.com

Read more here

Rangitoto Rambling

The Rangitoto Island Historic Conservation Trust held its AGM this month. The trust was formed in 1997 to conserve and interpret the historic bach communities on Rangitoto Island for the benefit of all New Zealanders.

The bach communities were built in the 1920s and 30s, consisting of private holiday dwellings and boatsheds as well as communal facilities such as paths, swimming pool, community hall and tennis courts. Built by families, using the scarce resources of the Depression era, the buildings demonstrate the ‘kiwi’ do-it-yourself, jack-of-all-trades attitudes of the times.

The trust has restored Bach 38 as a museum near Rangitoto Wharf, which is open by appointment. A short video on the history of the baches and their restoration is available at on Youtube The trust’s annual newsletter Rangitoto Rambling here.

Islands of the Gulf revisited

A classic 1960s book Islands of the Gulf has been reprinted. In the early Sixties Shirley Maddock joined seaplane pilot Captain Fred Ladd to visit isolated island communities, filming New Zealand’s first locally produced documentary series and spawning a book of the same name.
The new 2017 edition has been published to coincide with a remake of Islands of the Gulf, to screen on TV One later this year with Shirley Maddock’s daughter, actress and writer, Elisabeth Easther.

Read more here

Safeswim gets upgrade

Auckland Council has approved an upgrade of its Safeswim beach water quality monitoring programme. From next summer it will enable accurate forecasting of which of Auckland’s 69 bathing beaches might be unsafe, and when.

The programme upgrade will provide new tools to communicate monitoring results, giving better visibility of water quality issues. Mayor Phil Goff has said the public may be shocked when they see the figures on faecal contamination but “there are solutions.”

John’s Perspective

Last week we celebrated our eighth annual Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar with nearly 300 guests at Auckland Museum.

It was – as usual – a wonderful affirmation of the community that cares about the Hauraki Gulf/ Tīkapa Moana/ Te Moananui o Toi.

The theme of seabirds – ngā manu o te moana – enabled us to explore the practical details of conservation effort, as well as to soar high and consider broader relationships with nature.

I was struck by many presentations, among them Dame Anne Salmond’s assertion that our future is inextricably tangled with those of other lifeforms.

This edition of Gulf Journal revisits several talks: Rochelle Constantine’s taking of ‘the pulse of the Gulf’ and Mook Hohneck’s call for an embrace of Te Reo. We acknowledge the leadership of Biz Bell, who has shared the story of the taiko/ black petrel so generously and effectively. We update the quest of Jochen Zaeschmar – a speaker at the 2016 seminar – to find the elusive false killer whale and we recall a notorious centenary for Motuihe Island.

Enjoy these stories and the sustenance that the Gulf provides.

Mayor John Tregidga
Chair, Hauraki Gulf Forum.

Seachange

Sea Change – Council integration

Auckland Council has received an update on the integration of the Sea Change – Tai Timu Tai Pari Marine Spatial Plan into the Auckland Council group work programme and established a political steering group to oversee it.

The plan, produced through a three-year collaborative process, is a non-statutory document which aims to ensure the Hauraki Gulf is vibrant with life, its mauri strong, productive and supports healthy and prosperous communities.

Details here

DOC Community Fund opens

The fourth round of the Department of Conservation’s multi-million-dollar fund to support community conservation projects has opened for applications.

The fund had supported over 300 different projects to date, with around $4.15 million to be allocated this year.
“The DOC Community Fund encourages everyday New Zealanders to take ownership and lend a hand to important projects that matter to their communities,” Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says.

Expressions of interest are required by 23 June 2017, with successful applicants to be invited to submit a full application.
Last year funded projects included weed control on Motuihe Island (Motuihe Trust), Motuora Island (Motuora Restoration Society) and Te Matuku Bay on Waiheke (Te Matuku Bay Landcare Group), rat and cat control in the Windy Hill Sanctuary on Great Barrier (Windy Hill Rosalie Bay Catchment Trust), translocation of Coromandel brown kiwi to Motutapu (Motutapu Restoration Trust), wilding pine control at Te Karo Bay, eastern Coromandel (Tairua Environment Society) and kiwi recovery work on the Kuaotunu Peninsula, eastern Coromandel (Project Kiwi Trust).

www.doc.govt.nz/doc-community-fund

Dark sky bid

Great Barrier Island has applied to the Arizona-based International Dark-Sky Association to be declared an International Dark Sky Sanctuary, capitalising on its lack of light pollution and brilliant starry nights. A Dark Sky Sanctuary must have an exceptional or distinguished quality of starry nights and a nocturnal environment, and is protected for its scientific, natural, or educational value, its cultural heritage and/or public enjoyment.

QE2 covenants pay dividends

A study by the University of Waikato Institute for Business Research has found that QEII National Trust covenanting landowners are together spending an estimated $25 million of their own money every year to protect native species, forests, wetlands, and other special areas in their QEII covenants.

These landowners, the majority of which are farmers, have made an overall financial commitment of around $1.1 to $1.3 billion to protect these special areas of private and leased land since the QEII National Trust was set up forty years ago.

Waterway protection (20%), restoration planting (19%), wetland restoration (18%), weed control (15%), pest control (7%) and fence maintenance (7%) are the major contributors to total maintenance costs for QEII covenants.

Read more here

Community work boosted

More Coromandel brown kiwi will be introduced to Motutapu Island, thanks to funding in the latest round of the Department of Conservation Community Fund.

A $28,526 grant will allow the transfer at least 16 more Coromandel brown kiwi to the island to establish a genetically viable population of 40 to 50 birds. The project has translocated 24 birds to date.

Nine Auckland community-led conservation projects received funding, including for a new iwi ranger on Motuora Island and restoration work at Whenua Rangatira, New Zealand’s first co-governed public park created under the Orakei Act.

Read more here

Sea Change plan available

A Hauraki Gulf / Tikapa Moana marine spatial plan launched in December after three years work by a stakeholder working group is available on the Sea Change – Tai Timu Tai Pari project website.

The proposed plan contains five pathways designed to create long-term health and wellbeing for the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park. Transitions to high value wild caught and farmed fisheries, the creation of marine reserves areas and scaled up restoration initiatives, setting load limits and mitigation for sediment and nutrients, local-scale coastal management and ambitious public engagement are outlined in the December issue of the Gulf Journal.

Read it here

Support for GIFT

Foundation North has signed a memorandum of understanding with Auckland Council and the Department of Conservation.

The agencies will provide advice, technical expertise and support for the foundation’s Gulf Innovation Fund Together (GIFT) project.

GIFT is a $5 million innovation fund launched in August 2016 that aims to support the development of innovative solutions to complex environmental challenges facing the Hauraki Gulf.

www.giftofthegulf.org.nz

Marine environment report

The Ministry for the Environment and Statistics New Zealand released the first individual “domain” report – on the marine environment – created under the Environmental Reporting Act 2015 in November.

The report identifies key issues facing our oceans, ocean acidification, threats to native birds and marine mammals and the state of coastal habitats.

Environment Minister Dr Nick Smith said environmental reports are fundamental to understanding and addressing environmental challenges – an area where data has been lacking.

He also said next year new legislation would replace the Marine Reserves Act “to bring our marine legislation into the 21st Century, recognising that we need varying levels of protection.”

Read it here

Great Barrier investments

Great Barrier Island has a new Department of Conservation base at Okiwi, rebuilt and redeveloped following damage in the June 2014 cyclone.

Following the storm DOC has invested more than $2.5 million repairing tracks and facilities on the island.

Meanwhile, community trusts on Kotuku Peninsula, which includes Glenfern Sanctuary, and at Windy Hill Rosalie Bay have received funding of $108,000 to advance conservation work.

Rare species such as the black and Cooks petrels, pateke and chevron skink cannot survive without intensive pest control.

Read more here

Meri Kirihimete

The Million Metres Streams Project is offering a Christmas present that cleans rivers and lakes.

A $20 donation will plant one metre of stream bank with four native trees. An ‘e-gift card’ can be passed on to the person you are buying for.

The project aims to restore native bush to a million metres of New Zealand’s waterways.

Motutapu events

This year’s Partners Life DUAL triathlon, marathon, mountain bike, 10km run and walk events on Motutapu and Rangitoto will be held on Saturday 25th March 2017.

Proceeds from registrations support the work of the Motutapu Restoration Trust and entry numbers are limited to protect the environment.

www.thedual.co.nz

Story of the Gulf

Story of the Gulf

A new coffee table book on the ecological history of the Hauraki Gulf was launched this month charting its discovery, transformation and potential for restoration.

Author Raewyn Peart travelled widely through the marine park interviewing over sixty people – iwi leaders, those making a living from the Gulf, sailors, fishers and divers, and environmentalists who are all working to preserve and restore its heritage.

Read more here

Haturu – Little Barrier Island

Hauturu plan

The public has until October 11 to submit on a draft Conservation Management Plan for Te Hauturu-ō-Toi/Little Barrier Island Nature Reserve.

The draft ten-year plan has been prepared by the Department of Conservation in consultation with the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Trust and the Auckland Conservation Board.

It is part of a redress contained in the Ngāti Manuhiri Settlement Act 2012 that acknowledged Ngāti Manuhiri as kaitiaki of the Nature Reserve and provided for co-governance.

Taumata

GBI sanctuary expands

Great Barrier Island’s Windy Hill Sanctuary area has grown by 150 hectares thanks to the addition of private, family-owned land above Mulberry Grove.

Intense predator control across a total of 770 hectares will create an east to west coast corridor for birds and other threatened species.

Sanctuary trust manager Judy Gilbert said new pest management methods and equipment are enabling greater areas to be managed with the same level of resource. The sanctuary has trapped over 3500 rats per annum in recent years, benefiting birds, lizards, weta fruit and berries.

Read more here

Healthy Rivers/Wai Ora

A unique multi-sector collaborative group has recently finalised a proposed plan change for the Waikato and Waipa rivers.

The project aims to take the two rivers on the first stage of an 80-year journey towards being safe for swimming and food gathering, as is required by the legally binding Crown-iwi Te Ture Whaimana o Te Awa o Waikato (Vision and Strategy for the rivers).

Read more here

Haturu – Little Barrier Island

John’s Perspective

Big ambition

Scanning the content of this issue it is striking how many collaborative and co-governance processes are coming to fruition or being initiated.

The Department of Conservation has just released a draft Conservation Management Plan for Te Hauturu-ō-Toi/Little Barrier Island Nature Reserve created alongside Ngāti Manuhiri.

The Snapper 1 Strategy Group has agreed measures to rebuild the region’s snapper stock to a biomass target of 40% of the unfished state by 2040, while in the neighbouring Waikato and Waipa catchment a Collaborative Stakeholder Group has drafted a plan to make the rivers safe for swimming and food gathering in 80 years.

These are wickedly difficult challenges and the commitment and innovation required to resolve them is not easy.

The Stakeholder Working Group created three years ago to address challenges facing the Gulf will present its Sea Change Tai Timu Tai Pari marine spatial plan to sponsoring agencies shortly, before a public launch later in the year.

The Government has announced new challenges in the form of a public-private partnership to make New Zealand predator free by 2050 and a new Biodiversity Forum has been tasked with improving native biodiversity on private land.

On one hand it is easy to point out the challenges we face. The Forum has done that very effectively through its triennial State of our Gulf assessments. With the other it is harder to bind people into generating an adequately scaled and effective response.

But this is what we must do if we are to succeed in our role of protecting and enhancing the Gulf environment.

Our seminar this year Do the Right Thing looks to tease out the many strands required on that journey.

It is great to see the philanthropic sector coming on board to support the step changes that will be necessary.

Foundation North’s Gulf Innovation Fund Together (GIFT) will provide $1 million for the next five years to incentivise new ideas and prototypes. The Nature Conservancy will share its knowledge of ecological restoration and resource mobilisation with projects here, while the Tindall Foundation and the Next Foundation are already big and strategic players in the Gulf.

The next term of the Forum will be an exciting one as it looks to build on success and strengthen its leadership for changing times.

Do The Right Thing: The 2016 Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar

Do the right thing

The 2016 Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar asks what it takes to Do The Right Thing

  • Can our primary industries reinvent themselves and their relationship with ecosystems?
  • What is people-power unleashing around our islands, reefs and harbours?
  • How can 600 years of indigenous knowledge and culture inform the way?
  • Are fly fishing for kahawai and sailing with whales signs of the times?
  • And where might the government fit in all this?

The Hauraki Gulf Forum has assembled an outstanding line-up of speakers for its seventh annual seminar on Tuesday, September 13 at Auckland Museum.

Book here

Mercury Island tusked weta

Great Mercury/Ahuahu pest free

Great Mercury/Ahuahu was declared pest free by the Department of Conservation in May. This followed a rat eradication operation in winter 2014, which has removed kiore, ship rats and feral cats.

All islands in the Mercury group are now free of pests, making the significant biodiversity on the smaller islands much safer from pest invasion from Great Mercury/Ahuahu.

The islands are home to a tusked weta found nowhere else in the world, kaka, saddleback, little spotted kiwi, tuatara, 10 different species of lizards and hundreds of thousands of seabirds.

The operation was partly funded by the island’s part owner Sir Michael Fay, who says the challenge now is keeping the islands pest free.

“All it takes is for one person to allow a stowaway pest on their boat to escape and undo all the hard work that has gone on here in recent years.”

Read more here

Trees await historic planting on Maungakiekie

Trees on Maungakiekie

Three young tōtara and six pohutukawa were planted in a dawn ceremony on the tihi of Maungakiekie/One Tree Hill in June. It marked an historic moment for mana whenua following the return of Maungakiekie to them in the landmark Ngā Mana Whenua ō Tāmaki Makaurau Collective Redress Act.

Read more here

Robins return to Shakespear sanctuary

Robins return

The birdsong of the native North Island robin or toutouwai will once again fill Shakespear Open Sanctuary following the release of the first pairs in April.

Shakespear Open Sanctuary has been pest-free for almost five years through work by Auckland Council park rangers and biodiversity staff and volunteers from Shakespear Open Sanctuary Society Inc. The translocation of 20 birds from the Mangatutu (King Country) was led by Parker Conservation and Massey University and funded by the Royal Society of New Zealand.

www.sossi.org.nz

Coromandel brown kiwi arrive on Motutapu by waka

Lift by waka

Three of the North Island’s rarest kiwi caught a waka to their new home in the Hauraki Gulf in April.

The adolescent birds were released into the predator-free environment of Motutapu Island as part of an effort by several conservation groups to save the Coromandel brown kiwi.

The three kiwi, two female and one male, were found as eggs in Thames, taken to Auckland Zoo for incubation and then raised on Rotorua Island.

Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki chair James Brown said the journey was symbolic and signified traditional protocols and rituals.
They joined 22 other kiwi released on the island. Shore plovers and patake have also been released on Motutapu in recent months.

Read more here

Green winner

Te Whangai Trust was the Supreme Winner at the 2016 Green Ribbon Awards in June.

The Waikato-based trust has contributed to restoration projects bordering the Gulf, including recent development of catchment management plans for the Mangatarata-Miranda-Kaiaua Community Care Group. The Trust develops life skills and future employment prospects while helping community partners to restore ecosystems, wildlife corridors and waterways.

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry said “Te Whangai Trust’s community biodiversity project has changed people’s lives and made huge environmental strides in the Waikato. It’s all about teaching people skills while caring for the natural environment.”

tewhangai.org

Funds for conservation

Groups have until 1 July to apply to a multi-million dollar fund set aside to support community conservation.

The DOC Community Fund was set up in 2014 to distribute $26 million over four years to inspire and enable community-led conservation projects around New Zealand.

Read more here

Watercare Harbour Clean-Up Trust

Tamaki clean up

Watercare Harbour Clean-Up Trust and volunteers from Spark collected 5000 litres of litter within an hour from a 100 metre stretch of the Tamaki River in April. The most common items were bottles, plastic bags and polystyrene but included tyres, furniture, clothing, kids’ toys, and even a TV.

Watercare Harbour Clean-Up Trust contractors Hayden Smith and Ben Harris said that while the amount of rubbish was slightly higher than normal, types were typical of what is regularly collected around East Tamaki. Smith says the majority of rubbish is improperly disposed of on streets, then ends up in drains, the stormwater network and is moved by rain, wind and tides.

31 million litres of rubbish have been removed from Auckland harbours since the trust was launched in 2002.

Read more here

Nicola Macdonald face to face with a taiko carefully held by Skip

Haere Mai Tāiko

All seabirds are precious taonga to Ngati Rehua-Ngatiwai ki Aotea people and even more so the tāiko who breed exclusively on our sacred maunga Hirakimata and Hauturu-a-toi. We want to ensure that the last remaining colonies of tāiko are protected to ensure they remain part of our natural heritage and legacy for all future generations of New Zealanders.

... READ FEATURE
Polynesian waka arrival in Auckland

Waka return

Waka racing has returned to the Waitematā.

The inaugural Tāmaki Herenga Waka Festival was hosted on Auckland Anniversary weekend in January, reviving a 150 year old tradition.
The programme included competitive inter-tribal races and opportunities for the public to paddle a waka and learn about their cultural significance.

Orakei Water Sports president and Hauraki Gulf Forum member Moana Tamaariki-Pohe said the gathering of waka ama, waka tangata, waka taua and waka hourua represented a dream come true for her father, Ngati Whatua kaumatua Tamaiti Tamaariki.

Read more here

Blue Voluntours

Wet, fun and good

A new social enterprise has been established to support marine volunteering around Auckland.

Blue Voluntours is dedicated to marine conservation and offers eco tours to marine reserves, sea clean ups, whale and dolphin research and stand up paddle boarding missions with beach clean ups.

“We want to create a sustainable, rewarding experience for tourists and locals alike”, explains the founder of Blue Voluntours, Katja May.

Revive our Gulf video still

Revival going viral

A new video explaining the Revive our Gulf project’s work to restore mussel reefs is a popular hit with schools and youtube viewers.

The video was directed by designer Shaun Lee, presented by biologist Rebecca Barclay and funded by Auckland Council’s Environmental Initiatives Fund. It has been posted on the Science Learning Hub and currently features on its home page.

Hunua Project kokako Hunua Kokako Recovery Group's Dave Bryden with a kokako chick. Hunua Project kokako One of the Hunua Kokako Recovery Project's newest chicks, hatched in summer 2016.

Hunua birds thrive

Dozens of kōkako chicks have hatched in the Hunua Ranges, which border the western Firth of Thames, thanks to Auckland Council’s biggest ever pest control operation this summer.

Rat and possum densities were significantly reduced through the 1080-based pest control programme, which is expected to also benefit native plants, frogs and bats in the area.

Council staff worked closely with seven iwi with tribal ties to the area and other agencies to complete the successful operation.

Read more on the Hunua Kōkako Recovery Project’s Facebook page

2015 Holdaway Award winners.

Holdaway Awards

A Māori leader, a marine reserve scientist and family owners of an island are winners of this year’s Holdaway Awards.

Richelle Kahui-McConnell (Ngāti Maniapoto) has worked closely with Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei, leading practical restoration work at Okāhu Bay, encouraging youth involvement in conservation, and incorporating mātauranga Maori perspectives into policy development processes.

Dr Nick Shears from the University of Auckland has carried out internationally renowned research on marine reserves that has been crucial in understanding the ecological effects of fishing on inshore reefs and how these can be reversed with marine protection.

Rod and Sue Neureuter accepted an award on behalf of their family, who have owned the Noises since 1933, supporting the first successful island rat eradication in New Zealand 50 years ago as well as many restoration initiatives on the islands.

The Hauraki Gulf Forum-initiated awards recognise emerging leadership and were announced at the Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Seminar in October.

Trash

Creative waste approach

Auckland Council will be working with communities of the Gulf to create a Hauraki Gulf Islands Waste Plan in the first half of 2016, focusing on Great Barrier, Waiheke, Rakino and Kawau and on managing waste from boats and fishing. Programme manager Jenny Chilcott says each island community is unique and the aim will be to work with local communities to develop creative, sustainable solutions that support local interests.

There are over 7,000 households in the Gulf and on Great Barrier alone around 500 tonnes of refuse and inorganic waste is produced each year. Key issues include how to minimise waste coming on to Gulf islands, handling visitors, addressing fishing and boating waste and maximising local recycling and reusing of materials.

The plan will be guided by the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan adopted by Auckland Council in 2012 and Waiheke, Great Barrier and Rodney Local Boards will be closely involved.

Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

Winter planting opportunities

Plant now

Volunteer Week is June 21-27 with the theme “there is a place for you to volunteer”. Winter tree planting activities are being organised on Gulf islands and in regional parks.”

Motuihe Island recently celebrated planting its 400,000th tree since 2003. Red Boat Ferries run to the island every 2nd and 4th Wednesday of the month.

National Volunteer Week
www.motuihe.org.nz

Waiheke rubbish crew

Rubbish mountain

Love your Coast Waiheke Island recently posted a video of its 2015 clean-up campaign.

Over 400 students from low decile schools participated with support from Pureology, Auckland Council and Sealink, says Sustainable Coastlines Co Founder and CEO Sam Judd.

Volunteers removed 7,755 litres of litter (equivalent to 155 full rubbish sacks) from island beaches over seven event days.

Love Your Coast Waiheke Island 2015

Oneroa Beach

Waiheke views

Two surveys have been completed on Waiheke to gauge residents and ratepayers’ attitudes to marine protection.

Market research company Colmar Brunton undertook a questionnaire and views were sought through Auckland Council’s shapeauckland.co.nz website.

Chairman Paul Walden said the Waiheke Local Board would receive and consider the results in July or August. “The board is advocating for a network of marine protected areas that link the islands of its area. The survey seeks to identify principles through which our community will support marine protected areas and reserves. We want to get beyond divisive debate and have a conversation about a space that we can all agree on.”

Restored mussel bed

Gulf revival

The Revive our Gulf charitable trust, formed to trial the restoration of subtidal mussel reefs in the Hauraki Gulf, was a finalist in this year’s Green Ribbon Awards, run jointly by the Department of Conservation and Ministry for the Environment.

Revive our Gulf’s latest newsletter notes juvenile mussels have been found growing in the first reef it created in December 2013 following the deposition of seven tonnes of live adult mussels off eastern Waiheke Island. The 35mm size suggests the recruits would have settled into the beds since establishment rather than having been transported with the original mussels.

www.reviveourgulf.org.nz

Waiheke supports marine protection.

Waiheke survey

The results of a Waiheke Marine Protection Survey have been released by the local board.

It shows support for a network of marine protected areas across a substantial proportion of the marine environment around the inner Hauraki Gulf islands. The survey was undertaken by Colmar Brunton, with around 2000 questionnaires returned.

Responses regarding location were relatively spread out with no one specific area in the local board area receiving high or low levels of support as a marine reserve.

“The survey will assist our community to move forward and consider how to best address marine protection,” said Waiheke Local Board Chair Paul Walden.

Waiheke Marine Reserves Report 2015

Hauraki Gulf Marine Park Hauraki Gulf Forum